Clovelly NSW 2031, Real Estate Agents, Real Estate Commission, Fees, Costs

Avoid becoming a real estate casualty in Clovelly NSW 2031

Research has shown that 90% of home sellers and buyers have had a bad experience in dealing with real estate agents. Avoid becoming a casualty with your Clovelly NSW real estate agent… their fees, costs and commission were only the tip of the iceberg!

Clovelly NSW 2031 Real Estate Agents

If you are after a list of Clovelly real estate agents, the best agent, the top agent, you won’t find your answer instantly on any website. The information made available in an instant on a comparison website or, on a rating website, is not complete, is not the whole picture. The information you are given on these websites is limited to only the real estate salespeople in Clovelly that have joined their service.

If you are looking to sell, connect with an agent who will put more money in your pocket. Find out who they are from an independent source. A source that does not allow agents to subscribe to it, a source that does not have predetermined lists or affiliations with anyone. You can then rest assured that the information is truely independent.

Who Has The Keys To Your Clovelly NSW Home

How many people do you meet and after a brief chat of maybe 30 minutes or so you give them the keys to your home so they can come in whenever they like… whether you are home or not?

Do the people you trust the most in your life have the keys to your home... your Doctor, your Solicitor your Accountant?

Most people sell their home maybe once or twice in their lifetime. Most people take the decision of choosing their real estate agent far too lightly. Getting your real estate agent in Clovelly NSW right the first time will be one of the single biggest financial decisions you will make, ever.

So, who has the keys to your home? Before you invite a stranger, a real estate agent, into your financial life, understand if they will improve it or destroy it.

Planning to sell your real estate in Clovelly NSW?

There are 2 types of skilled real estate agents, you need to avoid one of them at all costs! read more >

Clovelly NSW Real Estate Commission and Fees

We have compared the major Agent Comparison sites and have all the numbers... read more >

Is Your Current Clovelly Real Estate Agent Giving You Grief

If you are currently on the market in Clovelly and things are not quite going to plan, feel free to contact us for a complimentary chat and we will get you back on the right path.

Got a Question?

If you have any questions relating to Clovelly real estate agents, their fees, commission, cost or just generally about selling your property in Clovelly feel free to drop me a line, contact me personally (Robert Williams) on 1300 886359 or email me direct at robert@irec.com.au

Who is iREC

Find out more about who we are and what we do >

About the suburb Clovelly

Clovelly is a mainly residential. Clovelly Beach is a small beach that sits on the end of the narrow bay. The bay is popular with swimmers. The bay is home to one of the first surf lifesaving clubs in the world, Clovelly Surf Life Saving Club, which was founded in 1906. Clovelly is surrounded by the suburbs of Bronte in the north, Randwick in the west and Coogee in the south.

Originally known as Little Coogee, the name was changed to Clovelly in 1913. When the search for a new name began, the English seaside town Eastbourne, was suggested. The president of the local progress association, Mr F H Howe, suggested Clovelly, the name of a local estate owned by Sir John Robertson, which was named for the village of Clovelly on the north Devon coast, England. William C. Greville bought 8 hectares (20 acres), which included the whole bay frontage, for 40 pounds in 1834. The area was dominated during the nineteenth century by the grand estate of Mundarrah Towers. Mundarrah Towers was built for Dr Dickson in the 1860s. Samuel Bennett, who owned Australian Town and Country Journal, one of the most influential newspapers of the day, bought the property and made further grand additions. The Towers was demolished in 1926, to make way for suburban development. The Mundarrah Towers estate occupied the land around Burnie Street overlooking the western end of Clovelly Bay. Mundarrah Street honours this once grand part of Clovelly's heritage. Between Coogee and Clovelly, on the shores of Gordon's Bay, stood Cliffbrook, the home built for John Thompson. By the early twentieth century the first governor of the Commonwealth Bank owned this grand mansion that was demolished in 1976. A public infants school was operating in Little Coogee as early as 1897, in the Mission Hall of the Church of England in Varna Street. Eliza McDonnell was the teacher with an average attendance of 76 pupils. Clovelly Public School officially dates from 1913. The Department of Education provided permanent accommodation for a public school in Arden Street, Clovelly. Major subdivisions for domestic housing commenced in earnest in Clovelly in 1909. The local progress association argued that there were 717 houses constructed within metres of the proposed tram route that had not yet been completed. Due to these lobbying efforts, the tram-line to Clovelly was completed between 1912-1913. This allowed Clovelly to continue developing throughout the 1920s. During the Great Depression Randwick Council instituted a scheme to keep unemployed men employed by building concrete foreshores for Clovelly in an attempt to make access to the bay's foreshores easier for bathers. The Council envisaged an Olympic size swimming pool in the bay, a facility that would also keep local men employed in the worst financial times. It was also planned to build a causeway/scenic road across the entrance to the Bay but wild storms in 1938 dashed hopes of this. The remains of the causeway are still visible at low tide, forming a protective reef. The plans were controversial; the merits of this work are still debated today. In 1907, a surf life saving brigade was formed at Clovelly, inaugurating the surf life saving tradition in this suburb that has seen numerous heroic rescues, including "the rescue off Schnapper" or "the big rescue" of Sunday 4 December 1927. Surf Life Saving has been a predominate part of the culture and heritage of this scenic coastal suburb. Competitive swimming is also a dominant part of life in this idyllic coastal location. Today the suburb is affectionately referred to as "Cloey" by many residents and locals. Trams Main article: Trams in Sydney The Clovelly tram line began at Alison Road to the intersection of Clovelly and Carrington Roads in 1912, then extending to Clovelly in 1913 helping to popularise the area. This line branched from Anzac Parade at Alison Road, and ran on its own tram reservation beside Centennial Park as far as Darley Road. Here it diverged from services to Coogee, to run north along Darley Road, then turned right into Clovelly Road to run down to its terminus at Clovelly Beach. Though services ran from Circular Quay and from Railway Square (from 1923). the line closed in 1957. The tram line followed the current route of bus 339.

Suburbs surrounding Clovelly, NSW

Centennial Park, 2021
Chifley, 2036
Coogee, 2034
Coogee Beach, 2034
Kensington, 2033
Kingsford, 2032
La Perouse, 2036
Little Bay, 2036
Malabar, 2036
Maroubra, 2035
Maroubra Junction, 2035
Matraville, 2036
Phillip Bay, 2036
Port Botany, 2036
Randwick, 2031
South Coogee, 2034