Kensington NSW 2033, Real Estate Agents, Real Estate Commission, Fees, Costs

Avoid becoming a real estate casualty in Kensington NSW 2033

Research has shown that 90% of home sellers and buyers have had a bad experience in dealing with real estate agents. Avoid becoming a casualty with your Kensington NSW real estate agent… their fees, costs and commission were only the tip of the iceberg!

Real Estate Agents in Kensington NSW 2033

If you are after a list of Kensington real estate agents, the best agent, the top agent, you won’t find your answer instantly on any website, well you will but you won't! The information made available in an instant on a comparison website or, on a rating website, is not complete, is not the whole picture. The information you are given on these websites is limited to only the real estate salespeople in Kensington that have joined their service.

If you are looking to sell, connect with an agent who will put more money in your pocket. Find out who they are from an independent source. A source that does not allow agents to subscribe to it, a source that does not have predetermined lists or affiliations with anyone. You can then rest assured that the information is truely independent.

Who Has The Keys To Your Kensington NSW Home

How many people do you meet and after a brief chat of maybe 30 minutes or so you give them the keys to your home so they can come in whenever they like… whether you are home or not?

Do the people you trust the most in your life have the keys to your home... your Doctor, your Solicitor your Accountant?

Most people sell their home maybe once or twice in their lifetime. Most people take the decision of choosing their real estate agent far too lightly. Getting your real estate agent in Kensington NSW right the first time will be one of the single biggest financial decisions you will make, ever.

So, who has the keys to your home? Before you invite a stranger, a real estate agent, into your financial life, understand if they will improve it or destroy it.

Planning to sell your real estate in Kensington NSW?

There are 2 types of skilled real estate agents, you need to avoid one of them at all costs! read more >

Real Estate Commission and Fees in Kensington NSW

We have compared the major Agent Comparison sites and have all the numbers... read more >

Did you know that even after you agree to a selling fee, it is still negotiable... read more >

Is Your Current Kensington Real Estate Agent Giving You Grief

If you are currently on the market in Kensington and things are not quite going to plan, feel free to contact us for a complimentary chat and we will get you back on the right path.

Got a Question?

If you have any questions relating to Kensington real estate agents, their fees, commission, cost or just generally about selling your property in Kensington feel free to drop me a line, contact me personally (Robert Williams) on 1300 886359 or email me direct at robert@irec.com.au

Who is iREC

Find out more about who we are and what we do >

About the suburb Kensington

Kensington is known for its village feel, cafes, and diversity of architecture - including Victorian terraces, cottages, warehouse apartments and new structures in the west of the suburb. The suburb is hilly in sections and contains established tree lined streets. The suburb is bounded by Racecourse Road to the north, Smithfield Road and the Maribyrnong River to the west, Dynon Road to the south, and Moonee Ponds Creek to the east. Kensington was once home to one of Victoria's major abbatoirs and livestock saleyards, an army ordnance depot and a number of factories. The stock yards ceased operation in 1984, prompting significant urban renewal. Kensington was named after Kensington in London.

Indigenous inhabitants Prior to European settlement, the area was inhabited by the Cadigal people, one of the salt-water clans of the Darug language group. The Cadigal people were known for their fishing skills and often travelled in canoes. The 1828 census showed some 50-60 clans of Cadigal people living by the Lachlan swamps of Kensington and surrounding areas. Swamps provided fruit, nectar, roots and tubers. Very few Aboriginals live in Kensington today. European settlement The suburb now known as Kensington was once called the "Lachlan Mills Estate", "Stannumville" and then "Epsom". It became Kensington in the late 1880s, starting life as an industrial suburb. Samuel Terry, the convict who became Australia's first millionaire, received a land grant in 1819. Daniel Cooper (1785-1853), also an ex-convict acquired land here in 1825 with his partner Solomon Levey, whom he later bought out. Cooper's nephew Daniel (1821-1902) planned to subdivide but in 1865 all developments was forbidden. Residential land was issued in the late 1880s and Kensington was to be the equivalent of London's distinguished suburb, Kensington. Kensington Racecourse opened in 1893 on the site of the current University of New South Wales. It did not compete with nearby Randwick Racecourse because it held midweek meetings, pony racing and related sports like polo. The course was also used to house troops and horses during the Boer War, World War I and World War II, as well as a migrant hostel during the late 1940s. The land was resumed in 1950 to construct Sydney's second university. The W.D. & H.O. Wills tobacco factory opened in Todman Avenue in 1902. The factory site also featured the Raleigh Park Social Club, an extensive sporting complex named after Sir Walter Raleigh who first introduced tobacco from North America to Europe. The factory closed in 1989 and was slowly converted into a high density residential neighbourhood by the Mirvac Group and Westfield in a joint venture known as Raleigh Park. The building used by the company is a two-storey brick building in the Georgian Revival style. It was designed by Joseland and Gilling and built c.1930. It was used by the Menzies Group of Companies as of 2013. It is heritage-listed. The hill that dominates West Kensington is occupied by the Sacred Heart Monastery, the Australian headquarters of the Catholic Missionaries of the Sacred Heart. The monastery was designed by Hennessy and Sheerin and built in 1895. It is a large stone building in the Gothic style and features an attic storey and a prominent central tower. It also includes a brick chapel in a Romanesque-Byzantine style which was designed by Mullane and built in 1939, and which is joined to the monastery by a matching brick cloister. The monastery is a prominent landmark which can be seen from various parts of Kensington and is now listed on the Register of the National Estate. The monastery publishes the long-running magazine Annals Australasia. Adjacent to the monastery is the Our Lady of the Sacred Heart Convent, a brick building in Federation Gothic style, which was built in 1897. It was the original site for primary and secondary colleges that were established soon after the construction of the convent, but these soon outgrew the premises. It is now the base for OLSH Provincial House and St Joseph's Aged Care Facility, while Our Lady of the Sacred Heart College is situated next door. Across the road is Our Lady of the Rosary Church (built 1906), Jubilee Hall and the Our Lady of the Rosary Primary School, which complete a large religious complex. The convent and church are heritage-listed. In the mid-twentieth century, the monastery was the home of the anti-Communist organiser Dr P.J. ('Paddy') Ryan and the popular Catholic controversialist Dr Leslie Rumble. Kensington's streets are named after local people, places in London and local flora. Some examples are: Balfour Lane - Arthur James Balfour, the first earl of Balfour, a British statesman and Prime Minister (1902-1905) Doncaster Avenue - Named after the racecourse in England Boronia Street - A flowering shrub grown extensively in the area. Tram history Main article: Trams in Sydney The line from Surry Hills to West Kensington commenced as a steam powered system in 1881. At this point the line travelled along Crown Street as far as Cleveland Street. The line was then extended to Phillip Street in 1909, Todman Avenue in 1912, and then to its final terminus down Todman Avenue, West Kensington in 1937. The line commencing from the city branched off from the tramlines in Oxford Street and ran down Crown Street to Cleveland Street in Surry Hills, then south along Baptist Street to Phillip Street, where it swung left into Crescent Street before running south along Dowling Street, tuning left into Todman Avenue where it terminated. Services operated full-time from Circular Quay, and to Railway in peak hours. The line down Crown Street closed in 1957, the remainder stayed open until 1961 to allow access to Dowling St Depot, (the current site of the Supa Centa Moore Park - Shopping Centre). As well as servicing West Kensington, tram services also operated on Anzac Parade, servicing the Maroubra and La Perouse line. Tay Park (bounded by Tay Street, Anzac Parade and Alison Road) is the site of the old Toll Bar where local maintenance revenue was collected from 1854 to 1894. The toll was 1 shilling for a four-wheeled wagon drawn by 2 horses. Sydney Buses routes 301, 302 and 303 generally follow the route down Crown and Baptist Streets as far as Phillip Street. Commercial area Kensington is heavily influenced by the University of New South Wales and the Racing Industry. It has a handful of cafes, restaurants and shops. Kensington has a shopping strip that extends most of the length of Anzac Parade and further south into Kingsford. 'Peters of Kensington' is a well known retail store on Anzac Parade. Kensington is next to Randwick Racecourse and Centennial Park. Transport Anzac Parade is the main road through Kensington. Numerous buses frequently service Kensington, linking it with the city and surrounding suburbs. There are no trains or light rail service, since the 1976 review of the Eastern Suburbs Railway abandoned the planned extensions to Kingsford. On 13 December 2012, the NSW Government announced a commitment to build a $1.6 billion light rail from Circular Quay down George Street to Central Station, then across to Moore Park and down Anzac Parade. South of Moore Park the line will spit into two branches - one of which will continue down Anzac Parade to the nine ways at Kingsford. Construction commenced in 2015.

Suburbs surrounding Kensington, NSW

Centennial Park, 2021
Chifley, 2036
Clovelly, 2031
Coogee, 2034
Coogee Beach, 2034
Kingsford, 2032
La Perouse, 2036
Little Bay, 2036
Malabar, 2036
Maroubra, 2035
Maroubra Junction, 2035
Matraville, 2036
Phillip Bay, 2036
Port Botany, 2036
Randwick, 2031
South Coogee, 2034