Lower Plenty VIC 3093, Real Estate Agents, Real Estate Commission, Fees, Costs

Avoid becoming a real estate casualty in Lower Plenty VIC 3093

Research has shown that 90% of home sellers and buyers have had a bad experience in dealing with real estate agents. Avoid becoming a casualty with your Lower Plenty VIC real estate agent… their fees, costs and commission were only the tip of the iceberg!

Real Estate Agents in Lower Plenty VIC 3093

If you are after a list of Lower Plenty real estate agents, the best agent, the top agent, you won’t find your answer instantly on any website, well you will but you won't! The information made available in an instant on a comparison website or, on a rating website, is not complete, is not the whole picture. The information you are given on these websites is limited to only the real estate salespeople in Lower Plenty that have joined their service.

If you are looking to sell, connect with an agent who will put more money in your pocket. Find out who they are from an independent source. A source that does not allow agents to subscribe to it, a source that does not have predetermined lists or affiliations with anyone. You can then rest assured that the information is truely independent.

Who Has The Keys To Your Lower Plenty VIC Home

How many people do you meet and after a brief chat of maybe 30 minutes or so you give them the keys to your home so they can come in whenever they like… whether you are home or not?

Do the people you trust the most in your life have the keys to your home... your Doctor, your Solicitor your Accountant?

Most people sell their home maybe once or twice in their lifetime. Most people take the decision of choosing their real estate agent far too lightly. Getting your real estate agent in Lower Plenty VIC right the first time will be one of the single biggest financial decisions you will make, ever.

So, who has the keys to your home? Before you invite a stranger, a real estate agent, into your financial life, understand if they will improve it or destroy it.

Planning to sell your real estate in Lower Plenty VIC?

There are 2 types of skilled real estate agents, you need to avoid one of them at all costs! read more >

Real Estate Commission and Fees in Lower Plenty VIC

We have compared the major Agent Comparison sites and have all the numbers... read more >

Did you know that even after you agree to a selling fee, it is still negotiable... read more >

Is Your Current Lower Plenty Real Estate Agent Giving You Grief

If you are currently on the market in Lower Plenty and things are not quite going to plan, feel free to contact us for a complimentary chat and we will get you back on the right path.

Got a Question?

If you have any questions relating to Lower Plenty real estate agents, their fees, commission, cost or just generally about selling your property in Lower Plenty feel free to drop me a line, contact me personally (Robert Williams) on 1300 886359 or email me direct at robert@irec.com.au

Who is iREC

Find out more about who we are and what we do >

About the suburb Lower Plenty

Lower Plenty, in earlier times part of Eltham, almost certainly got its name from the Lower Plenty Toll Bridge, built in 1860 to collect tolls across the Plenty River. This bluestone bridge still stands as part of the Lower Plenty Trail. A report of a court case, in The Argus newspaper, dated 1 May 1879, reveals two lads, Corkhill and Hodgson, "broke the windows of the old tollhouse, Lower Plenty bridge", some 19 years after the bridge was built. The suburb is bounded by the Plenty River in the west until it joins the Yarra River, which forms the southern boundary. Fitzsimons Lane forms the eastern boundary and Airlie Road north of Main Road (a continuation of Lower Plenty Road from the west) forms the northern boundary.

In February 1855 Hungarian immigrant Sigismund Wekey purchased 211 acres (0.85 km2) in what is now Lower Plenty, via The Victoria Vineyard and Garden Fruit Company of which he was manager, with a vision to start a wine industry in the new settlement of Melbourne. In March 1855, Wekey held a meeting at the Bulleen Hotel and called for shareholders, each "according to his means", for a proposed toll bridge, the first bridge ever built over the Upper Yarra, joining Lower Plenty to Templestowe, and replacing a punt being operated by the company. The bridge would cut five kilometres off the trip from the Eltham township to Melbourne, it was claimed at the meeting. A plan, backed by a group of Melbourne businessmen who would form the 'Templestowe Bridge Committee', attracted the necessary shareholders and the project was underway. Colonial Architect of the day, James Balmain did the design as a private commission, engineers and builders were Allott and Greenwood. The foundation stone, laid by John Hodgson M.L.C., on 18 August 1855, concealed a manuscript giving details of the ceremony. The bridge would have a span of 43 metres and a width of eight metres. It would cost ?2200 English Pounds ($US800,000 in today's currency). It would be located at the end of what is now Bonds Road, Lower Plenty, the land for this road being donated by local landowners John Seymour and David Bell, and the Central Road Board agreed to level the road to the bridge on the Templestowe side through the estate of Henry Stooke. Meantime Wekey conceived a plan for another bridge at Studley Park to improve and shorten the trip to the city even further. By 21 September the plan for this second bridge was underway. A stoppage in the works of the Templestowe Bridge was explained by Wekey on 22 September, as being a dispute between the Board and the contractors over payment when the foundation on the Lower Plenty side was found to be different from expected, causing a change in the design - the contractors were wanting more money to accommodate this. Unfortunately in January 1856 the Victoria Vineyard and Garden Fruit Company was forced to sell its land. The sale was to Mr King for eight English Pounds an acre - the land had been acquired originally for ?4.60 English Pounds an acre - but Wekey had been confident it would soon be worth ?18-20 English Pounds per acre. The company was to be wound up shortly after. It appears the Templestowe Bridge was operating by this time. In March 1862, a deputation of Eltham residents approached the Commissioner of Railways and Roads, requesting the government to buy the Templestowe Bridge then give it back to the Eltham District Road Board, as while its toll earning capability was not as "remunerative" as had been hoped, the bridge was a "great public convenience". The request was denied. In October 1863 there was a great flood causing the Yarra to rise 12 metres. It even flooded Elizabeth Street in Melbourne's Central Business District. A number of bridges were washed away. In March 1865 another deputation this time of Templestowe residents to the Acting Commissioner of Roads and Bridges, offered ?600 English Pounds raised by them towards a new bridge to replace the Templestowe Bridge and requested a government grant towards the cost. The Acting Commissioner "promised to give the matter further consideration" though he did not see "from what fund a sum of money could be granted to them". A repair job was carried out in 1873 and 1874. There were several more large floods, notably in October 1923, when the Templestowe Bridge, "a solid wooden structure on an iron girder, with stone supports" almost washed away again. The bridge also appears to have survived the significant December 1934 flood as it is mentioned in a news article in The Argus newspaper in February 1935. No other references have yet been discovered (regretfully no picture of Templestowe Bridge has been found and most residents don't even know a bridge was there). The last 'bits' of the Templestowe Bridge, joining Bonds Road, Lower Plenty to Finns Reserve at Thompson's Road, Templestowe, finally washed away in the 1960s. Around 1855 another bridge was built in what is now Lower Plenty but over the Plenty River. The Lower Plenty Toll Bridge, referred to above, bluestone blocks and steel, still stands today and is part of the Plenty River Trail, close to the Heidelberg Golf Club and the Lower Plenty Hotel. It is possible that the Templestowe Bridge was similar in appearance to this. 'The Lower Plenty School' opened in 1876. At the time this area was part of Eltham. Lower Plenty Post Office opened around 1902.

Suburbs surrounding Lower Plenty, VIC

Yallambie, 3085
Watsonia North, 3087
Watsonia, 3087
St Helena, 3088
Viewbank, 3084
Rosanna, 3084
Montmorency, 3094
Macleod, 3085
Ivanhoe East, 3079
Heidelberg Heights, 3081
Heidelberg West, 3081
Ivanhoe, 3079
Eltham North, 3095
Greensborough, 3088
Heidelberg, 3084
Eaglemont, 3084
Briar Hill, 3088
Bundoora, 3083
Bellfield, 3081