La Perouse NSW 2036, Real Estate Agents, Real Estate Commission, Fees, Costs

Avoid becoming a real estate casualty in La Perouse NSW 2036

Research has shown that 90% of home sellers and buyers have had a bad experience in dealing with real estate agents. Avoid becoming a casualty with your La Perouse NSW real estate agent… their fees, costs and commission were only the tip of the iceberg!

Real Estate Agents in La Perouse NSW 2036

If you are after a list of La Perouse real estate agents, the best agent, the top agent, you won’t find your answer instantly on any website, well you will but you won't! The information made available in an instant on a comparison website or, on a rating website, is not complete, is not the whole picture. The information you are given on these websites is limited to only the real estate salespeople in La Perouse that have joined their service.

If you are looking to sell, connect with an agent who will put more money in your pocket. Find out who they are from an independent source. A source that does not allow agents to subscribe to it, a source that does not have predetermined lists or affiliations with anyone. You can then rest assured that the information is truely independent.

Who Has The Keys To Your La Perouse NSW Home

How many people do you meet and after a brief chat of maybe 30 minutes or so you give them the keys to your home so they can come in whenever they like… whether you are home or not?

Do the people you trust the most in your life have the keys to your home... your Doctor, your Solicitor your Accountant?

Most people sell their home maybe once or twice in their lifetime. Most people take the decision of choosing their real estate agent far too lightly. Getting your real estate agent in La Perouse NSW right the first time will be one of the single biggest financial decisions you will make, ever.

So, who has the keys to your home? Before you invite a stranger, a real estate agent, into your financial life, understand if they will improve it or destroy it.

Planning to sell your real estate in La Perouse NSW?

There are 2 types of skilled real estate agents, you need to avoid one of them at all costs! read more >

Real Estate Commission and Fees in La Perouse NSW

We have compared the major Agent Comparison sites and have all the numbers... read more >

Did you know that even after you agree to a selling fee, it is still negotiable... read more >

Is Your Current La Perouse Real Estate Agent Giving You Grief

If you are currently on the market in La Perouse and things are not quite going to plan, feel free to contact us for a complimentary chat and we will get you back on the right path.

Got a Question?

If you have any questions relating to La Perouse real estate agents, their fees, commission, cost or just generally about selling your property in La Perouse feel free to drop me a line, contact me personally (Robert Williams) on 1300 886359 or email me direct at robert@irec.com.au

Who is iREC

Find out more about who we are and what we do >

About the suburb La Perouse

La Perouse peninsula is the northern headland of Botany Bay. It is notable for its old military outpost at Bare Island and the Kamay Botany Bay National Park. Congwong Bay Beach, Little Congwong Beach, and the beach at Frenchmans Bay provide protected swimming areas in Botany Bay. La Perouse is one of few Sydney suburbs with a French name, others being Sans Souci, Engadine and Vaucluse. Kurnell is located opposite, on the southern headland of Botany Bay.

La Perouse was known as "Gooriwal" to the Muruora-dial people of the area. La Perouse was named after the French navigator Jean-François de Galaup, comte de Lapérouse (1741-88), who landed on the northern shore of Botany Bay west of Bare Island on 26 January 1788. Captain Arthur Phillip and the first fleet of convicts had arrived in Botany Bay a few days earlier. Louis XVI of France had commissioned Lapérouse to explore the Pacific. In April 1770 James Cook's expedition had sailed onto the east coast of Australia whilst exploring the south Pacific searching for Terra Australis or 'Land of the South'. Upon King Louis XVI's orders, Lapérouse departed Brest, France, in command of Astrolabe and Boussole on 1 August 1785 on a scientific voyage of the Pacific inspired by the voyages of Cook. La Perouse in Sydney's south is named after the leader of this French expedition. Lapérouse's two ships sailed to New South Wales after 12 of his men had been attacked and killed in the Navigator Islands (Samoa). Astrolabe and Boussole arrived off Botany Bay on 24 January just six days after Captain Arthur Phillip (1738-1814) had anchored just west of Bare Island, in HMS Supply. On 26 January 1788, as Captain John Hunter was moving the First Fleet around to Port Jackson after finding Botany Bay unsuitable for a Settlement, Lapérouse was sailing into Botany Bay, anchoring there just eight days after the British had. The British received Lapérouse courteously, and offered him any assistance he might need. The French were far better provisioned than the British were, and extended the same courtesy but apparently neither offer was accepted. The commander of the Fleet, Captain Phillip, ordered that two British naval vessels, HMS Sirius and Supply, meet the French. Contrary to popular belief, the French did not have orders to claim Terra Australis for France and the arrival of the French ships Astrolabe and Boussole and their meeting with the ships of the British expedition was cordial and followed normal protocols. Lapérouse subsequently sent his journals and letters to Europe with the British ship, the Sirius. The expedition's naturalist and chaplain, Father Louis Receveur, died in February after a skirmish the previous December in Samoa with the inhabitants, in which Paul Antoine Fleuriot de Langle, commander of Astrolabe and 12 other members of the French expedition were killed. Receveur, injured in that skirmish, died at Botany Bay and was buried at Frenchmans Cove below the headland that is now called La Perouse, not far from the Lapérouse Museum. The place was marked by a tin plate but the local Aboriginal people quickly removed it. The British replaced it with another and tended the site. In 1824, the tree was inscribed by Victor-Charles Lottin (1781-1846), an ensign visiting with Louis Isidore Duperrey. The following year, Hyacinthe de Bougainville paid for the tombstone that is on the site today. It was designed by Government Architect George Cookney (1799-1876). Receveur was the second European to be buried in Australian soil, the first being Forby Sutherland from Cook's 1770 expedition who is buried at nearby Kurnell on the other side of the Botany Bay headlands. The French stayed at Botany Bay for six weeks and built a stockade, observatory and a garden for fresh produce on what is now known as the La Perouse peninsula. After completing the building a longboat (to replace one lost in the attack in the Navigator Islands) and obtaining wood and water, the French departed for New Caledonia, Santa Cruz, the Solomons, and the Louisiades. Lapérouse wrote in his journals that he expected to be back in France by December 1788, but the two ships vanished. The last official sighting of the French expedition was in March 1788 when British lookouts stationed at the South Head of Port Jackson saw the expedition sail from Botany Bay. The French expedition was wrecked a short time later on the reefs of Vanikoro in the Solomon Islands during a cyclone sometime during April or May 1788, the circumstances remained a mystery for 40 years. Some of the mystery was solved in 1826 when items associated with the French ships were found on an island in the Santa Cruz group, with wreckage of the ships themselves discovered in 1964. More recently two major expeditions have been mounted to explore the sites in Vanikoro. In May 2005, the wreck was formally identified as that of the Boussole. The 2005 expedition was embarked aboard Jacques Cartier, a French naval vessel. The ship supported a multi-discipline scientific team to investigate the "Mystery of Lapérouse". The mission was called "Opération Vanikoro-Sur les traces des épaves de Lapérouse 2005". A further similar mission was mounted in 2008. Between 16 September and 15 October 2008 two French Navy boats set out from Nouméa (New Caledonia) for a voyage to Vanikoro, recreating that section of the final journey of discovery made by Lapérouse.

Suburbs surrounding La Perouse, NSW

Centennial Park, 2021
Chifley, 2036
Clovelly, 2031
Coogee, 2034
Coogee Beach, 2034
Kensington, 2033
Kingsford, 2032
Little Bay, 2036
Malabar, 2036
Maroubra, 2035
Maroubra Junction, 2035
Matraville, 2036
Phillip Bay, 2036
Port Botany, 2036
Randwick, 2031
South Coogee, 2034